04 October 2018

Data Science: Data Products (Just the Quotes)

"Data scientists combine entrepreneurship with patience, the willingness to build data products incrementally, the ability to explore, and the ability to iterate over a solution. They are inherently interdisciplinary. They can tackle all aspects of a problem, from initial data collection and data conditioning to drawing conclusions. They can think outside the box to come up with new ways to view the problem, or to work with very broadly defined problems: 'there’s a lot of data, what can you make from it?'" (Mike Loukides, "What Is Data Science?", 2011)

"Discovery is the key to building great data products, as opposed to products that are merely good." (Mike Loukides, "The Evolution of Data Products", 2011)

"New interfaces for data products are all about hiding the data itself, and getting to what the user wants." (Mike Loukides, "The Evolution of Data Products", 2011)

"[...] a good definition of a data product is a product that facilitates an end goal through the use of data. It’s tempting to think of a data product purely as a data problem. After all, there’s nothing more fun than throwing a lot of technical expertise and fancy algorithmic work at a difficult problem." (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"As data scientists, we prefer to interact with the raw data. We know how to import it, transform it, mash it up with other data sources, and visualize it. Most of your customers can’t do that. One of the biggest challenges of developing a data product is figuring out how to give data back to the user. Giving back too much data in a way that’s overwhelming and paralyzing is 'data vomit'. It’s natural to build the product that you would want, but it’s very easy to overestimate the abilities of your users. The product you want may not be the product they want." (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"Generalizing beyond advertising, when building any data product in which the data is obfuscated (where there isn’t a clear relationship between the user and the result), you can compromise on precision, but not on recall. But when the data is exposed, focus on high precision." (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"Ideas for data products tend to start simple and become complex; if they start complex, they become impossible." (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"In an emergency, a data product that just produces more data is of little use. Data scientists now have the predictive tools to build products that increase the common good, but they need to be aware that building the models is not enough if they do not also produce optimized, implementable outcomes." (Jeremy Howard et al, "Designing Great Data Products", 2012)

"The best way to avoid data vomit is to focus on actionability of data. That is, what action do you want the user to take? If you want them to be impressed with the number of things that you can do with the data, then you’re likely producing data vomit. If you’re able to lead them to a clear set of actions, then you’ve built a product with a clear focus." (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"The key aspect of making a data product is putting the 'product' first and 'data' second. Saying it another way, data is one mechanism by which you make the product user-focused. With all products, you should ask yourself the following three questions: (1) What do you want the user to take away from this product? (2) What action do you want the user to take because of the product? (3) How should the user feel during and after using your product?" (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"You can give your data product a better chance of success by carefully setting the users’ expectations. [...] One under-appreciated facet of designing data products is how the user feels after using the product. Does he feel good? Empowered? Or disempowered and dejected?" (Dhanurjay Patil, "Data Jujitsu: The Art of Turning Data into Product", 2012)

"Data product usage is growing quickly, doubling every year. Obviously, since we made the investment, we'll work with our customer to find applications." (Ken Shelton)

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