30 March 2012

Project Management: Schedule (Definitions)

"The planned dates for performing activities and the planned dates for meeting milestones." (Timothy J  Kloppenborg et al, "Project Leadership", 2003)

"(1) A document showing the tasks for a project and specific calendar dates when each task will be started and completed. (2) The total time elapsed to build a product (calendar days)." (Richard D Stutzke, "Estimating Software-Intensive Systems: Projects, Products, and Processes", 2005)

"The set of project milestones and their planned dates of accomplishment. The actual dates of accomplishment are also usually recorded as the project proceeds." (Richard D Stutzke, "Estimating Software-Intensive Systems: Projects, Products, and Processes", 2005)

"The schedule contains all the activities that need to be performed, including their sequence and interdependencies, milestones, duration, estimated effort, start and end dates, as well as resource assignment. In addition, it should detail the critical path or paths." (Lars Dittmann et al, "Automotive SPICE in Practice", 2008)

"An ordered set of tasks characterized by duration and loading onto resources. For project management, this is the plan that specifies which people should perform what tasks when. For a concurrent system, this is a statement of what tasks should be executed by the scheduler and when." (Bruce P Douglass, "Real-Time Agility", 2009)

"The planned dates for performing schedule activities and the planned dates for meeting schedule milestones." (Project Management Institute, "Practice Standard for Project Estimating", 2010)

"The overall timeline for a project including task dates, durations, relationships, costs, and resource assignments." (Bonnie Biafore, "Successful Project Management: Applying Best Practices and Real-World Techniques with Microsoft Project", 2011)

"The planned dates for performing schedule activities and the planned dates for meeting schedule milestones." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies", 2011)

"An output of a schedule model that presents linked activities with planned dates, durations, milestones, and resources." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"A listing of project tasks, subtasks, and estimated completion times." (Robert F Smallwood, "Information Governance: Concepts, Strategies, and Best Practices", 2014)

"Time plan for a project or process. Note: on a construction project this is usually referred to as a 'project programme'. The construction industry tends to refer to programmes rather than schedules. Indeed the term schedule tends to mean a schedule of items in tabular form, e.g. door schedule, ironmongery schedule, etc." (Chartered Institute of Building, "Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development" 5th Ed., 2014)

Project Management: Fast-Tracking (Definitions)

"A schedule compression technique in which activities or phases normally done in sequence are performed in parallel for at least a portion of their duration." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"A specific project schedule compression technique that changes network logic to overlap phases that would normally be done in sequence, such as the design phase and construction phase, or to perform schedule activities in parallel." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies", 2011)

"Shortening the duration of a project by overlapping tasks that would normally be run sequentially, such as design and construction." (Bonnie Biafore, "Successful Project Management: Applying Best Practices and Real-World Techniques with Microsoft Project", 2011)

"The technique for shortening the schedule in which adjustments are made where possible to overlap tasks, execute tasks in parallel rather than in sequence, or shorten lag time." (Bonnie Biafore & Teresa Stover, "Your Project Management Coach: Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World", 2012)

"A specific project schedule compression technique that changes network logic to overlap phases that would normally be done in sequence, such as the design phase and construction phase, or to perform schedule activities in parallel. See also crashing and schedule compression." (Jeffrey K Pinto, "Project Management: Achieving Competitive Advantage" 5th Ed., 2018)

"Starting the construction process on a project while design is still underway (i.e., overlapping design and construction of a project)." (Peter Oakander et al, "CPM Scheduling for Construction: Best Practices and Guidelines", 2014)

25 March 2012

Project Management: Backlog (Definitions)

"A prioritized list of project requirements with estimated times to turn them into completed product functionality. Estimates are in days and are more precise the higher an item is in the Product Backlog priority. The list evolves, changing as business conditions or technology changes." (Ken Schwaber, "Agile Project Management with Scrum", 2004)

"A list of all to-do items for an application used in Scrum, corresponding to the OpenUP/Basic concept of a work item list." (Bruce MacIsaac & Per Kroll, "Agility and Discipline Made Easy: Practices from OpenUP and RUP", 2006)

"In Scrum, the list of features not yet implemented by the application." (Rod Stephens, "Beginning Software Engineering", 2015)

"An ordered list of user-centric requirements that a team maintains for a product." (Project Management Institute, "Practice Standard for Scheduling" 3rd Ed., 2019)

"A listing of product requirements and deliverables to be completed, written as stories, and prioritized by the business to manage and organize the project’s work." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"A set of software features awaiting development in a subsequent iteration." (Project Management Institute, "Software Extension to the PMBOK Guide" 5th Ed., 2013)

"The number of open or unsolved incidents. It is a running count of the difference between new tickets and tickets resolved." (Darril Gibson, "Effective Help Desk Specialist Skills", 2014)

"In an agile approach, the backlog is the set of requirements to be implemented in the project." (Cate McCoy & James L Haner, "CAPM Certified Associate in Project Management Practice Exams", 2018)

11 March 2012

Project Management: Scrum (Definitions)

"An agile method whose focus is on project management and requirements management. Scrum is often combined with XP." (Pramod J Sadalage & Scott W Ambler, "Refactoring Databases: Evolutionary Database Design", 2006)

"An agile software project management process introduced by Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland. Scrum is known for self-organized teams, thirty-day iterations called Sprints, daily team meetings called Scrum, and a to-do list called Product Backlog." (Bruce MacIsaac & Per Kroll, "Agility and Discipline Made Easy: Practices from OpenUP and RUP", 2006)

"An agile process based on a football analogy, using small teams working in an intensive, independent manner." (Bruce P Douglass, "Real-Time Agility", 2009)

"An iterative incremental framework for managing projects commonly used with agile software development." (IQBBA, "Standard glossary of terms used in Software Engineering", 2011)

"An iterative, incremental methodology for project management often seen in agile software development, a type of software engineering." (DAMA International, "The DAMA Dictionary of Data Management", 2011)

"A development methodology that uses frequent small increments to build an application iteratively and incrementally." (Rod Stephens, "Beginning Software Engineering", 2015)

"An iterative and incremental time-boxed method of developing software using small, self-directed teams. The goal of scrum is to flexibly develop what customers find valuable." (Pamela Schure & Brian Lawley, "Product Management For Dummies", 2017)

"An agile framework for developing and sustaining complex products with specific roles, events, and artifacts." (Project Management Institute, "Practice Standard for Scheduling" 3rd Ed., 2019)

"Iterative and incremental product development framework used in agile projects." (Jurgen Janssens, "Managing Customer Journeys in a Nimble Way for Industry 4.0", 2019)

"Scrum is a style of agile software development. It is built around the idea of iterative development and short daily meetings (called scrums) where progress or problems are shared." (Alex Thomas, "Natural Language Processing with Spark NLP", 2020)

"An agile process framework for managing knowledge work, with an emphasis on software development." (Kamalendu Pal & Bill Karakostas, "Software Testing Under Agile, Scrum, and DevOps", 2021)

"An iterative and incremental software development to handle drawbacks of traditional development methodologies. It produces many releases in short times based on customer requirements, time pressure, competition, product quality and available resources." (Fayez Salma & Jorge M Gómez, "Challenges and Trends of Agile", Balancing Agile and Disciplined Engineering and Management Approaches for IT Services and Software Products, 2021)

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