30 January 2012

Project Management: Assumptions (Definitions)

"When used in a Business Case, forecast, or other planning document, an assumption is a statement that relates to a potential future state or future situation." (Steven Haines, "The Product Manager's Desk Reference", 2008)

"Assumptions are factors that, for planning purposes, are considered to be true, real, or certain without proof or demonstration." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies®", 2011)

"Hypothesis, belief, or conjecture made when something is not known with certainty. In cost accounting, assumptions exist for the various quantitative analysis techniques (e.g., CVP or regression analysis) and general quantitative decision rules (e.g., for product emphasis decisions). People also make assumptions to create cost accounting information (e.g., linear cost function). Poor quality assumptions lead to poor quality information and decisions. Failure to objectively analyze assumptions can lead to biased decisions." (Leslie G Eldenburg & Susan K Wolcott, "Cost Management" 2nd Ed, 2011)

"A condition that will affect the project, although the specifics of the condition are not yet known. For the purposes of planning, the specifics are assumed and called out as an assumption." (Bonnie Biafore & Teresa Stover, "Your Project Management Coach: Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World", 2012)

"Hypotheses regarding the conditions necessary for the realization of strategies over which the organization has no control. Assumptions represent the risks that you may not achieve desired outcomes. Any change to an assumption during the execution cycle should force a revision." (Paul C Dinsmore et al, "Enterprise Project Governance", 2012)

"Something that is taken for granted to be true." (Joan C Dessinger, "Fundamentals of Performance Improvement" 3rd Ed, 2012)

"A factor in the planning process that is considered to be true, real, or certain, without proof or demonstration." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"Something presumed to be true. Assumptions are the basis of all statistical analysis. (It is important that the analyst choose methods based only on assumptions that are reasonable for the application.)" (Meta S Brown, "Data Mining For Dummies", 2014)

"An assumption is something that is taken for granted or unquestionably accepted as true." (Ken Sylvester, "Negotiating in the Leadership Zone", 2015)

"A factor in the planning process that is considered to be true, real, or certain, without proof or demonstration." (Project Management Institute, "A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)", 2017)

"Unproven business supposition used to make rapid progress toward a conclusion." (Pamela Schure & Brian Lawley, "Product Management For Dummies", 2017)

20 January 2012

Project Management: Products (Definitions)

"An output of a process." (Requirements Engineering Qualifications Board, "Standard glossary of terms used in Requirements Engineering", 2011)

"A product is an output of a process." (IQBBA, "Standard glossary of terms used in Software Engineering", 2011)

"An artifact that is produced, is quantifiable, and can be either an end item in itself or a component item. Additional words for products are material and goods. Contrast with result." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies", 2011)

"Also called deliverable or output, the thing that the project produces (physical thing or event)." (Mike Clayton, "Brilliant Project Leader", 2012)

"An input or output, whether tangible or intangible, that can be described in advance, created, and tested." (Paul C Dinsmore et al, "Enterprise Project Governance", 2012)

"An artifact that is produced, is quantifiable, and can be either an end item in itself or a component item. Additional words for products are material and goods. Contrast with result." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

Project Management: Deliverables (Definitions)

"An identifiable, required result of a task. Deliverables usually are part of an overall project completion plan." (Microsoft Corporation, "Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Data Warehouse Training Kit", 2000)

"Any measurable, tangible, verifiable outcome, result, or item that needs to be produced to complete a project or a phase of a project." (Margaret Y Chu, "Blissful Data ", 2004)

"The tangible or intangible work product from a functional team member." (Steven Haines, "The Product Manager's Desk Reference", 2008)

"A work product completed within a project phase by members of a project thread; the defined output of one or more related IT tasks." (Janice M Roehl-Anderson, "IT Best Practices for Financial Managers", 2010)

"Also called product or output, the thing that the project produces (physical thing or event)." (Mike Clayton, "Brilliant Project Leader", 2012)

"Any unique and verifiable product, result, or capability to perform a service that is required to be produced to complete a process, phase, or project." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies, 2nd Ed.", 2013)

"Any unique and verifiable product, result, or capability to perform a service that must be produced to complete a process, phase, or project. Often used more narrowly in reference to an external deliverable, which is a deliverable that is subject to approval by the project sponsor or customer. See also product and result. " (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies®", 2011)

 "Any (work) product that must be delivered to someone other that the (work) product’s author." (Software Quality Assurance)

"Something that must be provided to meet a commitment in a SLA or contract." (ITIL)

Project Management: Work Package (Definitions)

 "A deliverable or project work component at the lowest level of each branch of the work breakdown structure. See also control account." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies®", 2011)

"A task that represents actual work that resources do; it appears at the lowest level of the WBS." (Bonnie Biafore, "Successful Project Management: Applying Best Practices and Real-World Techniques with Microsoft® Project", 2011)

"A defined chunk of work, usually contained within a single work stream." (Mike Clayton, "Brilliant Project Leader", 2012)

"The task defined at the lowest level of the work breakdown structure. The work package is a project component that's finite enough to be estimated, scheduled, assigned, tracked, and managed. Often synonymous with task." (Bonnie Biafore & Teresa Stover, "Your Project Management Coach: Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World", 2012)

"The work defined at the lowest level of the work breakdown structure for which cost and duration can be estimated and managed." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies, 2nd Ed.", 2013)

"A well-defined scope of work that terminates in a deliverable product or completion of a service." (Christopher Carson et al, "CPM Scheduling for Construction: Best Practices and Guidelines", 2014)

"Set of tasks identified in order to reach one or several goals for business lines. A work package can be part of a project or a program." (Gilbert Raymond & Philippe Desfray, "Modeling Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF", 2014)

"The lowest level of the WBS; it is assigned a unique identifier." (Cate McCoy & James L Haner, "CAPM Certified Associate in Project Management Practice Exams", 2018)

"A document used to agree and record the business analysis work to be carried out, the boundaries, activities and outputs/deliverables." (Christina Lovelock & Debra Paul, "Delivering Business Analysis: The BA Service handbook", 2019)

"A document that identifies the work the assigned resources are to perform and any specifications associated with the work. This can range from a simple to-do list to a full page of notes and supporting documents such as specifications, blueprints, and guidelines. Also known as the WBS dictionary." (Bonnie Biafore & Teresa Stover, "Your Project Management Coach: Best Practices for Managing Projects in the Real World", 2012)

17 January 2012

Project Management: Project Governance (Definitions)

"Systems and methods by which a program is monitored, managed, and supported by its sponsoring organization." (Project Management Institute, "The Standard for Program Management" 3rd Ed.., 2013)

"A document that describes the systems and methods to be used to monitor, manage, and support a given program, and the responsibilities of specific individuals for ensuring the timely and effective use of those systems and methods." (Project Management Institute, "The Standard for Program Management" 3rd Ed. 2013)

"The alignment of project objectives with the strategy of the larger organization by the project sponsor and project team. A project’s governance is defined by and is required to fit within the larger context of the program or organization sponsoring it, but is separate from organizational governance." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"Project governance helps make sure that a project is executed according to the standards of the organization performing the project. Governance keeps all project activities above board and ethical, and also creates accountability." (Chartered Institute of Building, "Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development" 5th Ed., 2014)

"The framework, functions, and processes that guide project management activities in order to create a unique product, service, or result to meet organizational, strategic, and operational goals." (Project Management Institute, "A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide)", 2017)

"Governance is the framework by which an organization is directed and controlled. Project governance includes, but is not limited to, those areas of organizational governance that are specifically related to project activities." (ISO 21500:2012)

15 January 2012

Project Management: Project Lifecycle (Definitions)

"A collection of generally sequential project phases whose names and numbers are determined by the control needs of the organization." (Timothy J  Kloppenborg et al, "Project Leadership", 2003)

"A set of activities organized to produce a product and/or deliver services. A project life cycle partitions the activities of a project into a sequence of phases to assist planning and management. The early phases gather and analyze information about user needs, product requirements, and alternative designs. Later phases elaborate and implement the design. Some life cycles are iterative, performing certain activities multiple times. Same as project life cycle model." (Richard D Stutzke, "Estimating Software-Intensive Systems: Projects, Products, and Processes", 2005)

"A collection of generally sequential project phases whose name and number are determined by the control needs of the organization or organizations involved in the project. A life cycle can be documented with a methodology." (Project Management Institute, "Practice Standard for Project Estimating", 2010)

"Sequence of phases of the project from beginning to end." (Mike Clayton, "Brilliant Project Leader", 2012)

"The series of phases that a project passes through from its initiation to its closure" (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"The period between the start of the Assess stage to the handover of the asset to the user or the operations group." (Paul H Barshop, "Capital Projects", 2016)

"The series of phases that a project passes through from its start to its completion." (Project Management Institute, "A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide)", 2017)

"A collection of generally sequential project phases whose name and number are determined by the control needs of the organization or organizations involved in the project. A life cycle can be documented with a methodology." (Jeffrey K Pinto, "Project Management: Achieving Competitive Advantage" 5th Ed., 2018)

"The series of generally sequential Phases a project passes through from beginning to end. Starting, organizing and preparing, performing project work, closing; cost and staffing levels low at the start and end; risk and uncertainty greatest at the start; ability to influence highest at start; later changes cost more." (H James Harrington & William S Ruggles, "Project Management for Performance Improvement Teams", 2018)

Project Management: Project Plan (Definitions)

"A formal, approved document used to guide both project execution and project control." (Timothy J  Kloppenborg et al, "Project Leadership", 2003)

"A document that identifies project tasks, and describes how an organization intends to perform and control these tasks. The plan typically describes the tasks, the schedule, the production and management processes, the resources required, organization and responsibilities of the participants, and potential risks. For large projects, project plan(s) are usually split into several separate plans covering development, configuration management, quality assurance, risk management, and so forth." (Richard D Stutzke, "Estimating Software-Intensive Systems: Projects, Products, and Processes", 2005)

"A plan that provides the basis for performing and controlling the project’s activities, which addresses the commitments to the project’s customer." (Sandy Shrum et al, "CMMI: Guidelines for Process Integration and Product Improvement, Second Edition", 2006)

"The project plan consists of one or several planning documents (e.g., work breakdown structure, schedule, resource planning) that define the project scope and essential project attributes. It may also consist of a directory structure with different files. The project plan is the basis for project control. If the project plan consists of several planning documents, care must be taken that, in sum, the individual documents represent a conclusive, coherent whole." (Lars Dittmann et al, "Automotive SPICE in Practice", 2008)

"A document that describes a project and the plan for completing it and achieving its objectives. The project plan guides the execution and control of the project." (Bonnie Biafore, "Successful Project Management: Applying Best Practices and Real-World Techniques with Microsoft Project", 2011)

"Documentation of a project's projected activities including timing, resource assignments, assumptions, constraints, costs, etc." (Bill Holtsnider & Brian D Jaffe, "IT Manager's Handbook" 3rd Ed., 2012)

"A formal, approved document used to guide both project execution and project control. The primary uses of the project plan are to document planning assumptions and decisions, facilitate communication among stakeholders, and document approved scope, cost, and schedule baselines. A project plan may be summary or detailed." (Peter Oakander et al, "CPM Scheduling for Construction: Best Practices and Guidelines", 2014)

"Includes the project charter and project schedule and a delineation of all project team members and their roles and responsibilities." (Robert F Smallwood, "Information Governance: Concepts, Strategies, and Best Practices", 2014)

"Detailed proposal, that describes activities and resources needed to achieve an objective" (ITIL)

13 January 2012

Project Management: Methodology (Definitions)

"A methodology is a set of guidelines or principles that can be tailored and applied to a specific situation. In a project environment, these guidelines might be a list of things to do. A methodology could also be a specific approach, templates, forms, and even checklists used over the project life cycle." (Jason Charvat, "Project Management Methodologies", 2003)

"A defined, repeatable approach to address a particular type of problem. A methodology typically centers on a defined process but may also include definition of content. May be used interchangeably with the term method." (David Lyle & John G Schmidt, "Lean Integration: An Integration Factory Approach to Business Agility", 2010)

"A logical sequence of tasks and activities that have deliverables as an end result. Implementation projects typically follow a predefined methodology." (Janice M Roehl-Anderson, "IT Best Practices for Financial Managers", 2010)

"A mature set of processes applied to various stages of an application’s life cycle to help reduce the likelihood of the presence or exploitation of security vulnerabilities." (Mark S Merkow & Lakshmikanth Raghavan, "Secure and Resilient Software Development", 2010)

"A system of practices, techniques, procedures, and rules used by those who work in a discipline." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies", 2011)

10 January 2012

Project Management: Project Scope (Definitions)

"The sum of the products and services to be provided as a project." (Timothy J  Kloppenborg et al, "Project Leadership", 2003)

"The set of features, functions, and attributes associated with a given set of product or service requirements. The scope of work is that work that is to be carried out in order to create or update a product." (Steven Haines, "The Product Manager's Desk Reference", 2008)

"The sum of the products, services, and results to be provided as a project." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies®", 2011)

"The work that must be performed to deliver a product, service, or result with the specified features and functions." (Cynthia Stackpole, "PMP® Certification All-in-One For Dummies®", 2011)

"All that the project must do and create. It can be expressed in terms of activities, articulated by the WBS or in terms of deliverables, articulated by the PBS." (Mike Clayton, "Brilliant Project Leader", 2012)

"The range of features and functions that categorize a performance improvement intervention." (Joan C Dessinger, "Fundamentals of Performance Improvement" 3rd Ed, 2012)

"The work performed to deliver a product, service, or result with the specified features and functions." (For Dummies, "PMP Certification All-in-One For Dummies" 2nd Ed., 2013)

"The boundaries of a project. Projects include a scope definition so that personnel understand the project boundaries. Identifying the scope helps prevent scope creep." (Darril Gibson, "Effective Help Desk Specialist Skills", 2014)

"The resource domain and scope circumscribe the describable properties and the possible purposes that descriptions might serve. (From §5.3, “The Process of Describing Resources”.)" (Robert J Glushko, "The Discipline of Organizing: Professional Edition" 4th Ed, 2016)

"The features and characteristics of a product. Scope creep occurs when additional features are added during development." (Pamela Schure & Brian Lawley, "Product Management For Dummies", 2017)

01 January 2012

Project Management: Project (Definitions)

"A project is a specific work assignment outside the routine of the normal job that has a planned end and a measurable accomplishment to be achieved." (Michael S Dobson, "The Juggler's Guide to Managing Multiple Projects", 2003)

"A concerted effort of work for a specific period of time to produce a unique end result." (Margaret Y Chu, "Blissful Data ", 2004)

"A group of related activities and tasks associated with accomplishing a specific goal or objective. As referred to in this book, projects usually produce a deliverable from a person or person in a functional department." (Steven Haines, "The Product Manager's Desk Reference", 2008)

"A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result." (Project Management Institute, "The Standard for Portfolio Management" 3rd Ed., 2012)

"An endeavour that stands out of the ordinary set of activities. It has clear start and end points and produces a defined outcome. It is a coordinated set of activities." (Mike Clayton, "Brilliant Project Leader", 2012)

"A temporary endeavor that seeks to deliver unique value and benefits via activities that are thought to have predictable outputs and/or outcomes. Projects are managed in a manner that seeks to ensure efficient delivery of work products with precisely prescribed specifications, on time and on budget." (Richard J Heaslip, "Managing Complex Projects and Programs", 2014)

"A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result." (PMI, "Implementing Organizational Project Management: A Practice Guide", 2014)

"Unique process, consisting of a set of co-ordinated and controlled activities with start and finish dates, undertaken to achieve an objective conforming to specific requirements, including constraints of time, cost and resources." (Chartered Institute of Building, "Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development, 5th Ed", 2014)

"A formal commitment of resources to deliver known results by a specified time." (The Data Warehousing Institute)

"A project consists of a unique set of processes consisting of coordinated and controlled activities with start and end dates, performed to achieve project objectives. Achievement of the project objectives requires the provision of deliverables conforming to specific requirements." (ISO 25000)
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